Posts tagged ‘humor’

March 30, 2015

National Humor Month

By Angela Verges

Guess what? April is National Humor Month. This is an ideal time to read a humorous book. I recently had the opportunity to meet author/illustrator Peter Brown at a book signing. He was funny and so are some of his picture books.

Peter Brown demonstrating how he illustrated the tiger In Mr. Tiger Goes Wild

Peter Brown demonstrating how he illustrated the tiger In Mr. Tiger Goes Wild

During his presentation, Peter Brown showed the audience how he drew the tiger from his book, Mr. Tiger Goes Wild. As he read the story, the kids in the audience roared and laughed along with the story. Add this to your reading list for April to see what adventures arise.

Title: Mr. Tiger Goes Wild Author/Illustrator: Peter Brown Genre: Picture Book Ages: 3-6

Title: Mr. Tiger Goes Wild
Author/Illustrator: Peter Brown
Genre: Picture Book
Ages: 3-6

 

Add a bit of hilarity to your reading with another one of Peter Brown’s books, Flight of The DoDo. Mr. Brown’s humor begins on the first page when Penguin is pooped on by a goose flying overhead. What will happen next? Open this delightful book to find out what happens with Penguin and some of his bird friends.

Title: Flight of The DoDo Author/Illustrator: Peter Brown Genre: Picture Book Ages: 3-6

Title: Flight of The DoDo
Author/Illustrator: Peter Brown
Genre: Picture Book
Ages: 3-6

One more book to add to your list of humorous reading is, Children Make Terrible Pets, again by Peter Brown. Has your child ever asked to have a pet? In this story, the author has cleverly woven together a story about a bear who wants to keep a boy as a pet.

 

Title: Children Make Terrible Pets Author/Illustrator: Peter Brown Genre: Picture Book Ages: 3-6

Title: Children Make Terrible Pets
Author/Illustrator: Peter Brown
Genre: Picture Book
Ages: 3-6

In addition to reading humorous stories this month, you can also schedule a few fun family activities. Here are three to get you started?
1. Read a joke book.
2. Gather the family and have each person tell their favorite joke or make one up.
3. Do a silly dance, then laugh at yourself.

What are some of your favorite humorous books or family activities that add humor to your life?

August 1, 2013

leeks, boys, and those long afternoons

Today, I’m posting about tough parenting days over at the awesome Leanne Shirtliffe’s IronicMom.com for Whiteboard Wednesday (today making a super special appearance on Thursday!). I’m excited to be there so click here to read my post!

She would post herself, perhaps, but she’s celebrating the awesomeness that is her latest (and firstest!) parenting book, Don’t Lick the Minivan. Leanne is funny, honest (mostly I think), and makes you think you are not alone in the world of parenting.

dontlicktheminivanTitle: Don’t Lick the Minivan
Author: Leanne Shirtliffe
Genre: Parenting, Humor
Ages: Old, or at least those people who feel that way because of their kids 🙂

Here is a description of her book from IndieBound: (but warning, if you read this, you are going to want to buy it immediately!)

As a woman used to traveling and living the high life in Bangkok, Leanne Shirtliffe recognized the constant fodder for humor while pregnant with twins in Asia’s sin city. But in spite of deep-fried bug cuisine and nurses who cover newborn bassinets with plastic wrap, Shirtliffe manages to keep her babies alive for a year with help from a Coca-Cola deliveryman, several waitresses, and a bra factory. Then she and her husband return home to the isolation of North American suburbia. In Don’t Lick the Minivan, Shirtliffe captures the bizarre aspects of parenting in her edgy, honest voice. She explores the hazards of everyday life with children such as: The birthday party where neighborhood kids took home skin rashes from the second-hand face paint she applied.The time she discovered her twins carving their names into her minivan’s paint with rocks.The funeral she officiated for “Stripper Barbie.”The horror of glitter.And much more A delayed encounter with postpartum depression helps Shirtliffe to realize that even if she can’t teach her kids how to tie their shoelaces, she’s a good enough mom. At least good enough to start saving for her twins’ therapy fund. And possibly her own. Crisply written, Don’t Lick the Minivan will have parents laughing out loud and nodding in agreement. Shirtliffe’s memoir might not replace a therapist, but it is a lot cheaper.

If you are done laughing yet, head on over to see my own post at IronicMom.com.

December 5, 2012

Snicket’s wrong questions make for fun reading

In case things were getting a little too serious around here, I’d like to introduce Daniel Handler (aka Lemony Snicket) to introduce the latest book I read, Who Could That Be At This Hour?, which tells the story of Snicket’s rather unusual childhood. And while I’ve been talking about a lot of serious books you can talk to your kids about, nothing gets a good relationship going like a shared laugh. So read this one with your kids now. Laugh together. Build up a foundation of shared reading. And then when the time comes, it will be all the easier to read and talk about the books I blogged about earlier. This would be great holiday reading! Something to share with the kids when school is out.

Anyway, he’s funny as you can tell, and so are his books. If you haven’t read him before, he has a cynical, slightly dark, but extremely fun voice. Definitely recommend this first installment in his “All the Wrong Questions” series. Great laid-back holiday reading!

whocouldthatbeatthishour

Title: Who Could That Be at This Hour?
Author: Lemony Snicket
Genre: Mystery, Humor, Lots of Fun
Age: Reading to Adult, chapter book/early middle grade level

What about you? Do you have favorite funny stories? Have you asked the wrong question at the wrong time? What are you going to read with your kids when school is out?

 

March 14, 2011

Eating your way through high school

In a world of flashing television screens and internet news that comes before the actual event is finished, the subtle is often overlooked.  Which is why SCBWI’s Sid Fleischman Humor Award is so refreshing.  SCBWI is a horrid acronym that stands for the “Society for Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators”.  The Sid Fleishman Humor Award honors the author of the same name, known for books that were both humorous and poignant.  My latest read was the 2010 winner, and I definitely understand why.  It’s not funny-ha-ha, or LOL funny, but it’s definitely a funny book.  A really well-written funny book with a strong, character with a great humorous tone and a good message for its readers.  So thank you SCBWI for honoring this book so that we would all know about it, and thank you Allen Zadoff, for writing it in the first place.

Title: Food, Girls, and Other Things I Can’t Have
Author: Allen Zadoff
Genre: Fiction
Age: Middle School and High School (book takes place in a High School)

Summary and Review:

Andy is an overweight–read really overweight–sophomore who doesn’t see a lot of upsides to his life.  His dad ignores him while his mom, a caterer who tries to get him to eat less (while getting his skinny sister to eat more), overprotects him.  His best friend is his model UN partner and he is picked on, shoved, or overlooked by most of the rest of the school.  Until he is not.

One day he does the impossible–makes friends with the star football player and, on what seems like a whim, tries out for the football team.  He starts living the high school equivalent of the high life–with parties, girls, and football player friends.  But just when you are about to put the book down because it all seems so unreasonable, the dreams begin to unravel.  There’s his mom, who never signed the permission slip for him to play and yanks him off the team when she finds out.  There’s the girl he loves but might be dating someone else.  And there’s the football players he thought were his friends.  But are they?

The book is at once sweet, funny, and a rich portrayal of high school.  At its heart, it’s a book about being true to who you really are.

Follow-up with the kids:

This book strings you along for quite some time in the fantasy-like atmosphere of the popular realm.  I think it would be great to talk to your kids when they are still being strung along, talk about the changes that Andy makes when he joins the football team and why they’ve been good or bad for him.  And then find out if they still feel that way in the end.  My guess is that a lot of teens and preteens who read this book won’t necessarily love the ending.  They might not understand the decisions that Andy makes.  Having that conversation with them would be an important step in understanding who your child is, where they fit into the crazy social strata of high school, and what hopes and dreams they might be harboring–dreams that might show them more heartbreak than happiness if they were to really come true.  Andy is a great character who gives us a fun ride through his high school days.  He’s a fun guy to spend time with, an as a result, so is this book.