Posts tagged ‘grammar’

July 26, 2013

Little Red Writing Hood

OMG THIS BOOK IS SO GOOD!!! I squealed with excitement when I opened up the package from Chronicle Books and saw the cover. Then I squealed some more as I realized just how tremendously awesome the story was. I only just stopped squealing a few moments ago so I could share all this goodness with you! Here’s the deal. Little Red Writing is the kind of picture book you can’t help but pick up. The cover is beautiful, the colors brilliant, and the story hook tempting. Little Red Writing is a pencil? And she wants to tell a story? And she gets lost on the way to the end!!!

It’s a children’s writer’s/teacher’s/librarian’s dream come true. But here’s the good part–the kids are going to love it too. The small ones, who won’t know what a conjunction is for many a year to come, will just love the funny story of the pencil and the really gorgeously original illustrations. The older ones will love a fun reminder about how to write a story. The story starts out with Little Red’s teacher, Ms. 2 (love it!) asking the class to write a story.

littleredwriting

Title: Little Red Writing
Author: Joan Holub
Illustrator: Melissa Sweet
Genre: Picture Book
Ages: 2 – 8

Little Red begins to write:

Once there was a brave red pencil who went on a journey. As she walked along…

But then a thought bubble from Little Red interrupts the story:

Walking is boring, decided Little Red. She wanted her story to be exciting. She went to the gym and was quickly drawn into action. (LOVE THAT WRITING!) She bounced! She boogied! Then she cartwheeled right off the page…

Okay, there you go, only a few pages into the book and already a lovely little lesson about using more powerful verbs to tell your story. But it gets better, because Little Red tumbles into…

a deep, dark, descriptive forest.

Ha! Has anyone ever heard the editing advice that you should go through your manuscript and throw out all the adjectives? Well, that might be a tad harsh, but it has a ring of truth in it and even this picture book is here to warn you about it! Then LIttle Red meets some “conjunction glue” and she squeezed the bottle. What happens?

Too many glue words came out! So that is how she found herself writing a sentence that would not end but just kept going and going and running on and on although it had no purpose yet it would not…

Yes! It’s true. The book DOES just keep getting better and better. And if you have an older kid, they could find all the conjunctions on that page. Little Red Writing doesn’t just learn about parts of speech, she also learns about parts of a story.

It was the middle of her story, where something exciting should happen. And it did.

You, too will love this story all the way to principal granny and the Wolf 3000 pencil sharpener. And your kids will be introduced to so many features of writing, whether you help them realize it or not! This book comes out in September, just in time to get your pencils sharpened!

And if you liked this book, check out two word smithing books: Ann And Nan Are Anagrams and Wumbers.

July 18, 2013

anagram THIS

Okay, don’t do that because that would mean a different four-letter word and this is a family-friendly blog. But if you would like to work on some other anagrams, boy do I have the book for you. I LOVE this book! One of the most excited things about having a book blog is getting unexpected goodies in the mail. And Chronicle Books always sends me some awesome ones.

annandnanTitle: Ann and Nan are Anagrams
Author: Mark Shulman
Illustrator: Adam McCauley
Genre: Picture Book
Age: 4 – 9

Ann and Nan are Anagrams is a picture book filled with anagrams. (In case you are thinking “WHAT is she talking about?”, an anagram is a word or a phrase rearranged to make another word or phrase. Like Ann and Nan in the title of this book. Or spot, stop, tops, pots, and post on pages 4 and 5.)

There are some anagrams in the text itself.

Then she whispered like a wise shepherd.

Or how about one of my favorites:

…bring me your aunt. She’s a nut.

And as you might expect, the anagramming leads the story a bit, which leads to a crazy, goofy plot. This page gets an interesting illustration:

The schoolmaster was in the classroom teaching vowels to wolves and feeding presents to serpents.

There are also anagrams spread through the illustrations. Such as “eleven plus two = twelve plus one” on the chalkboard at school or “Gold Roaches Grade School” on the door.

The illustrations are bright and fun and remind me of an old circus poster for some reason. Maybe the fancy fonts (to point out the anagrams) combined with all the yellows and reds.

I love this book for a young reader or even a pre-reader who is learning a few words, because they can really stop and enjoy the words. It teaches them that stories are made of words and words are made of letters and that sometimes, there’s a lot of fun to be had in that!

Let your kids find the anagrams in the text. (It’s made easier with matching font for each one. And you can move on to the anagrams hidden in the pictures as well. Then have them make up their own anagrams. You could write letters on index cards and have them mix and match them around until they find different words. (For example, give them one card with “S”, one with “P”, one with “O” and one with “T” and see if they can rearrange them to make the words from the book I listed above.) Good luck!