anagram THIS

Okay, don’t do that because that would mean a different four-letter word and this is a family-friendly blog. But if you would like to work on some other anagrams, boy do I have the book for you. I LOVE this book! One of the most excited things about having a book blog is getting unexpected goodies in the mail. And Chronicle Books always sends me some awesome ones.

annandnanTitle: Ann and Nan are Anagrams
Author: Mark Shulman
Illustrator: Adam McCauley
Genre: Picture Book
Age: 4 – 9

Ann and Nan are Anagrams is a picture book filled with anagrams. (In case you are thinking “WHAT is she talking about?”, an anagram is a word or a phrase rearranged to make another word or phrase. Like Ann and Nan in the title of this book. Or spot, stop, tops, pots, and post on pages 4 and 5.)

There are some anagrams in the text itself.

Then she whispered like a wise shepherd.

Or how about one of my favorites:

…bring me your aunt. She’s a nut.

And as you might expect, the anagramming leads the story a bit, which leads to a crazy, goofy plot. This page gets an interesting illustration:

The schoolmaster was in the classroom teaching vowels to wolves and feeding presents to serpents.

There are also anagrams spread through the illustrations. Such as “eleven plus two = twelve plus one” on the chalkboard at school or “Gold Roaches Grade School” on the door.

The illustrations are bright and fun and remind me of an old circus poster for some reason. Maybe the fancy fonts (to point out the anagrams) combined with all the yellows and reds.

I love this book for a young reader or even a pre-reader who is learning a few words, because they can really stop and enjoy the words. It teaches them that stories are made of words and words are made of letters and that sometimes, there’s a lot of fun to be had in that!

Let your kids find the anagrams in the text. (It’s made easier with matching font for each one. And you can move on to the anagrams hidden in the pictures as well. Then have them make up their own anagrams. You could write letters on index cards and have them mix and match them around until they find different words. (For example, give them one card with “S”, one with “P”, one with “O” and one with “T” and see if they can rearrange them to make the words from the book I listed above.) Good luck!

2 Comments to “anagram THIS”

  1. That sounds fantastic! Can you ask them to send me books in the post too lol.

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