Archive for May, 2013

May 14, 2013

Your glove is on the wrong hand but that doesn’t matter when you are reading

 

 

 

 

 

Is there anything better than standing in the outfield? The sun on your back and a glove in your hand? If you are a baseball fan, you might not think so. But I think I recently found something slightly better. And that is standing in the outfield, the sun on your back, telling the five-year-old next to you that their glove is on the wrong hand and they should probably switch it over before the batter swings, even though the likelihood of the batter connecting with the ball–much less hitting it to the outfield, even though the outfield in this case is about 18 inches behind second base–are, frankly, low.

In honor of the upcoming t-ball season, of the promise of hours in the green grass and the sunshine gently suggesting to batters that they face the pitcher, not the catcher, and to fielders that they put the glove on the other hand, I’m re-posting some of my favorite baseball books for kids. Try reading them right before you grab the tee and head outside.

 

TitleHome Run!
Author: David Diehl
Genre: Board Book, Sports
Ages: 0 – 3

 

The David Diehl sports books were some of my son’s favorite early books. They were the first he learned to “read” by memorizing the words on each page and he was excited to turn the pages and shout out what he remembered. (This one already made the blog, so you can read more about it here if you like.)

 

TitleBaseball Saved Us
Author: Ken Mochizuki
Illustrator: Dom Lee
Genre: Picture Book, Sports
Ages: 2 – 10

 

I’ve blogged about this book already, but this is a great one for young kids and preschool kids and even elementary students. They will each get something a little different out of it. It’s a very versatile book: the youngest readers will hear a great baseball story and be introduced to some harder topics they will only really understand later. Older readers could use this to talk about more serious historical and ethical issues, especially in a teacher-led discussion. In fact, you could use this book in a middle school class and have the kids do their own picture book on an historical event. That would be interdisciplinary awesomeness! 🙂

 

TitleFantasy Baseball
Author: Alan Gratz
Genre: Fantasy, Sports
Ages: Upper Elementary and Middle School

 

I’ve never read this one! But I bought it recently and am excited to. Have you read it? Let me know what you think. He’s got other baseball books out there, including Samurai Shortstop, if you are interested in more.

 

 

TitleThe Art of Fielding
Author: Chad Harbach
Genre: The Great American Novel (I read recently that this is now a “genre” which I thought was both hysterical and accurate. This books certainly fits within that genre, Moby Dick references and all)
Ages: Adult

 

I loved this book. It’s a great read for anyone who likes literature and baseball. And if you had to pick only one of the two, I’d probably buy it for a literature-lover before a baseball-lover, although the whole book really does revolve around the sport.

 

Enjoy your summer, your baseball, and your books!

Betsy's_Day _at_the_Game-coverTitle: Betsy’s Day At The Game
Author: Greg Bancroft
Illustrator: Katherine Blackmore
Genre: Early Reader, Sports
Ages: 4 – 10

Betsy’s Day at the Game is the size of a picture book, but really an early reader, meant more for the adult to read to the child. It’s a text-heavy given the nature of teaching, but explains the game and score-keeping well. This is a book that brings it’s own family acitivity: simply read, head to the ballpark, and start keeping score! Don’t forget to include the family memories like Betsy does, and if you aren’t heading to a ballgame anytime soon, you could start your own memory book instead.

May 11, 2013

it’s not easy to get out of the Easy

outoftheeasyHere’s the first sentence.

My mother’s a prostitute.

Not how your average YA book begins. But keep reading. Here’s the rest of the paragraph:

Not the filthy, streetwalking kind. She’s actually quite pretty, fairly well-spoken, and has lovely clothes. But she sleeps with men for money or gifts, and according to the dictionary, that makes her a prostitute.

Don’t you love that voice? That character? And don’t you want to read more? I did. Thus begins the story of Josie, a seventeen-year-old protagonist with one very strong desire: to leave behind everything she knows and get out of New Orleans. Or as the title says it, “Out of the Easy”.

I loved this book. It had everything I want: fast-moving plot, lots of action and drama, strong characters with strong desires, and great writing. Some of the great characters include Josie, the main character who cleans the brothel and works in a bookstore, her two guy friends (the bookish one and the cool one), her mother (a tragic and not very nice character), the colorful madam of the house who looks after Josie, and many, many others who come in and out and fill beautiful and dark roles.

Despite the setting, and the opening lines, this book is pretty PG-rated. We are talking some mild kisses and one almost-groping scene…lightyears away from Twilight, for example. I know there are some people who will say “what’s a prostitute doing in a YA book”? But those people probably haven’t read YA in about 50 years, and they likely don’t know many teens.

Most teens will relate to this character’s desire to get away from anything and everything they’ve always known. Of course, most teens do this in more of a figurative sense–with behavior (and a lot of “whatever”s). But the idea is the same, the pull to be in charge of their own life, to set out and make their mark. Another way to say it comes from David Copperfield, in a line oft-quoted in this book: “Whether I turn out to be the hero of my own life, or whether that station will be held by anybody else, these pages must show.”

Reading this book with your kid would be a great foray into those questions. You might not be able to directly ask your teen what they want to change in their lives (but if you are, awesome!). But you could start with a hypothetical. If they could get in that car with Josie and drive anywhere they wanted, where would they go? What would they want to do when they got there? And go back to that quote from David Copperfield. If they learn it as the quote from Out of the Easy, so be it. It’s something every teen should think about, and this book will make them do just that.

outoftheeasyTitle: Out of the Easy
Author: Ruta Sepetys
Age: 12 and up
Genre: Historical Fiction